How to delete data properly


Here at Norfolk Computer Services we often get requests from clients when they accidentally delete something, especially when they have worked on it all day! This can be frustrating and feels like the end of the world. Don't panic as deleting files is not as permanent as you may think.


However what if you need to destroy the data properly? Maybe for GDPR reasons or prior to the disposal of your IT hardware? The you need to take a more thorough approach at deleting your data.


Deleting or 'trashing' data, isn't enough to keep your data safe!

Deleting items, or "trashing" them, doesn’t permanently remove them from computer memory. While the data is still stored on your device’s hard disk, it’s possible someone could restore that deleted data.


Data does reach a point at which it’s no longer useful, and you are no longer required to maintain it. Nevertheless, it may still be valuable to cybercriminals. Bad actors can use names, addresses, credit card numbers, banking accounts, or health data. You need a policy to destroy paper records, magnetic media, hard drives, and any storage media.


Your obligation to protect customer and staff information extends to properly destroying all identifying data. Installing a new operating system isn’t going to do it. Encryption doesn’t do the job if the cybercriminal can figure out the password.


Some industries require you to prove you have correctly destroyed all data. Even if you have no compliance standards to meet, carefully dispose of any computer-related device. Whenever you are recycling, discarding, or donating an old computer, disk drive, USB stick, or mobile device, make sure the data is already properly deleted or destroyed. Otherwise, criminals could get their hands on confidential business information.


Fully, safely deleting & destroying your data


So, what do we mean by “properly” destroyed? You know about shredding paper documents. You can actually do the same with some devices. You might send the computer or device to a company with a mega-shredder. When compliance matters, you should keep a record of the chain of custody of the data throughout the process.


Overwriting the data, often called zeroing, is another solution. No data is properly deleted until it’s written over – that’s where the information is hidden under layers of nonsensical data and cannot be retrieved through disk or file recovery utilities. Think of this as writing three new books over the top of the pages of an erased book rather than just ripping the pages out.


With magnetic devices, you can neutralise the magnetism (degaussing) to break down the data. This scrambles up the data beyond recovery. A strong degausser will turn the device into a shiny metallic paper weight. An ultraviolet erase could be necessary for some erasable programmable memory.


If you’re really committed to destroying data, physically destroy the device. There’s the shredding solution, or you might actually pay to have the device smelted or pulverised.


Need help deleting or destroying your data or hardware? Give us a call at Norfolk Computer Services at 01953 857980 or contact us online, we are here to help with your IT support

Norfolk Computer Services specialise in IT support for small to medium sized business, to find out more take a look at our services page.

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